Did You Know?

In 1835 a young Louis Vuitton left his working-class village in the French countryside and set off by foot for Paris, where he secured a position as an apprentice box-maker and packer. At the time, the wealthy had their belongings professionally packed in order to withstand rough travel conditions, and boxes and trunks were custom-made to fit specific items. By the the early 1850s, Vuitton became the personal box-maker and packer for Empress Eugenie, Napoleon III’s wife, and soon opened his own Parisian packing workshop that featured a line of rectangular-shaped, flat-bottomed trunks that were easier to stack than the traditional, curved-top styles of the day. As his popularity continued to increase among the French elite, Vuitton’s products were knocked off by competitors. In an effort to combat this issue, four years after Vuitton’s 1892 death, his son Georges, who had taken over the business, designed the distinctive, now-famous LV monogram. (x)

Man checking out a woman on a late 19th century open car, c. 1900 (x)

Man checking out a woman on a late 19th century open car, c. 1900 (x)

Young woman sitting in the sun, c. 1915 (x)

Young woman sitting in the sun, c. 1915 (x)

Couple during the Great War, c. 1914 (x)

Couple during the Great War, c. 1914 (x)

An unidentified Royal Navy Brig with its crew posing on deck and in the rigging, c. 1850 (x)

An unidentified Royal Navy Brig with its crew posing on deck and in the rigging, c. 1850 (x)

Audry Hepburn shopping with her pet deer “Ip” in Beverly Hills, CA, 1958 (x)

Audry Hepburn shopping with her pet deer “Ip” in Beverly Hills, CA, 1958 (x)

Jayne Mansfield departs by helicopter to Rotterdam, 1957 (x)

Jayne Mansfield departs by helicopter to Rotterdam, 1957 (x)

The Dalai Lama at age 2, 1937 (x)

The Dalai Lama at age 2, 1937 (x)

Coal Mine Workers in West Virginia, 1908 (x)

Coal Mine Workers in West Virginia, 1908 (x)